Date: Tuesday, May 17, 2016
Location: The Philadelphia School
Title: Exploring Mathematical Questions Through Scratch
Topic(s): Coding for Students; Geometry
Presenter(s): Steve Garland, Ph.D.; Josh Taton, Ph.D. Cand.

More details will follow…stay tuned! Resources will be posted here…stay tuned!


Date: Tuesday, April 26, 2016
Location: The McCall School
Title: Rescue Me! Fire Trucks, the Pythagorean Theorem, and Promoting Problem-Solving Through Technology
Topic(s): Geometry; Technology Tools
Presenter(s): Josh Taton, Ph.D. Cand.; Elizabeth Houwen, M.S.Ed., M.A.

More details will follow…stay tuned! Resources will be posted here…stay tuned!


Date: Tuesday, April 20, 2016
Location: The Philadelphia School
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Date: Tuesday, March 20, 2016
Location: The Philadelphia School
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Date: Tuesday, February 20, 2016
Location: The Philadelphia School
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Date: Tuesday, January 20, 2016
Location: The Philadelphia School
Title:
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Date: Tuesday, November 20, 2015
Location: The Philadelphia School
Title:
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Date: Tuesday, October 20, 2015
Location: The Philadelphia School
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Date: Wednesday, October 7, 2015 Location: The Philadelphia Education Fund / Math + Science Coalition Title: Please Excuse My Dear Aunt…? Topic(s): Order of Operations; Authentic Problem-Solving; Introducing the PAMTC Presenter(s): Joshua A. Taton, Ph.D. Cand.; Kathy Boyle, M.S.Ed. Can you finish this phrase? This is one of the most-remembered, and least well-understood, sayings in all of school mathematics; using this phrase covers-up a lot of algebraic complexity and often leads to confusion and frustration for students (and their teachers!). Indeed, the conventional order of operations is often regarded as one of the more frustrating–dare I say “boring?”–topics to teach. Why do we have the order of operations? Are other “orders” possible? What are some strategies for alleviating student misapplications? Can the order of operations support understanding other content, like promoting algebraic understanding in middle and high school? And, most importantly, can you study the order of operations via authentic problem-solving, rather than as a simple, straightforward skill? In this session, we share a problem that might turn the order of operations on its ear…in working on this problem together, we will discover *new* ideas that even mathematicians don’t know! As time permits, we may also discuss simple, strategic ways to take some of the “boring” problems from your curriculum and turn them into more engaging, problem-solving opportunities for your students. Resources will be posted here…stay tuned!


Date: Tuesday, September 15, 2015 Location: The Philadelphia School Title: Traffic Jam & Partnering with Curriculum Materials Topic(s): Counting and ordering; Mathematical Patterns; Myths about Curriculum & Standards Presenter(s): Aimee S.A. Johnson, Ph.D.; Joshua A. Taton, Ph.D. Cand. Thank you to everyone who attended this workshop and, especially, our new attendees! The 2015-2016 series of monthly workshops kicked-off with a puzzle that involved two three-person expeditionary parties crossing a river. Given a series of possible moves, could the parties exchange places and cross the river safely? Moreover, how many moves would be required? What if there were more people in each party? Or different-sized parties? Solving this puzzle stretched our ability to record our work, using clear notation. In addition, we needed to be careful to count moves appropriately and look for patterns, while counting. After discussing our strategies, we had a brief presentation and discussion on three myths about curriculum-use and the importance of partnering with curriculum materials. Since there is no such thing as a Common Core-aligned curriculum, and since each of our schools and classes of students is unique, we must rely on our professional expertise to make effective adaptations of curriculum. At the same time, tossing out the curriculum is not recommended, because many curricula are based on solid research about students’ thinking and learning and provide for cross-grade and within-grade cohesion. Asking teachers to develop, test, and teach curriculum is like asking them to do three jobs (or more) at one time! Future sessions, this year, will explore tools for analyzing curriculum and making effective adaptations. Resources and Discussion